Although mitigation and adaptation require increased climate finance, adjustment has generally received less support and mobilized less private sector action. [46] A 2014 OECD report indicated that in 2014, only 16% of global funds were devoted to climate change adaptation. [50] The Paris Agreement called for a balance between climate finance between adaptation and mitigation, and in particular highlighted the need to increase support for adaptation to parties most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, including least developed countries and small island developing states. The agreement also reminds the parties of the importance of public subsidies, as adaptation measures receive less investment from the public sector. [46] John Kerry, as Secretary of State, announced that the United States would double grant-based adjustment funding by 2020. [33] The quality of each country on track to meet its obligations under the Paris Agreement can be continuously monitored online (through the Climate Action Tracker[95] and the Climate Clock). After signing, the parties formally adhere to the Paris Agreement. This can be done by depositing with the Secretary-General one of the different types of instruments — instruments of “ratification, acceptance or approval”. There is no deadline for countries to submit these instruments. A country may deposit its instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval on the same day as it signs it or submit it separately much later. If a country has not signed in a year, it can subsequently accede to the Paris Agreement by presenting an instrument of accession. For more information on each instrument, see below. France, a major player in the ratification of the Paris Agreement, facilitated its entry into force less than a year before COP22 was held in Marrakech in 2016.

Both the EU and its Member States are individually responsible for ratifying the Paris Agreement. It has been reported that the EU and its 28 Member States are simultaneously depositing their instruments of ratification to ensure that neither the EU nor its Member States commit to obligations belonging exclusively to each other[71], and some feared a disagreement on each Member State`s share of the EU-wide reduction target. Just like the British vote to leave the EU, the Paris Pact could be delayed. [72] However, on 4 October 2016, the European Parliament approved the ratification of the Paris Agreement[60] and the European Union deposited its instruments of ratification on 5 October 2016 with several Eu Member States. [72] For many countries, the power to conclude international agreements is shared between the executive (head of state, cabinet or council) and the legislative power (parliament). For these countries, a head of state is usually empowered to negotiate and sign an international agreement, but must obtain the agreement of the national legislator (or Parliament) before formally acceding to the agreement. Negotiators for the agreement said the INDCs presented at the time of the Paris conference were insufficient and noted “with concern that estimates of aggregate greenhouse gas emissions in 2025 and 2030, resulting from projected national contributions, did not fall under the least expensive 2°C scenarios, but would end at a projected level of 55 gigatonnes in 2030.” and recognizing that “much greater efforts will be needed to reduce emissions in order to keep the global average temperature rise to less than 2°C by reducing emissions to 40 gigatons or 1.5°C”. [25] [Clarification required] The Paris Agreement is an agreement within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that addresses the reduction, adaptation and financing of greenhouse gas emissions from 2020 on or after 2020. . .