Michel said the trade agreement, signed in October 2016 and entered into force in September 2017, increased trade by 24 percent for goods and 25 percent for services compared to before CETA level. On 27 April 2009, EU member states adopted a negotiating mandate for the implementation of a new economic free trade agreement between the EU and Canada: the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). Negotiations were officially launched at the EU-Canada Summit in Prague, Czech Republic, on 6 May 2009. The first meeting on the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement between Canada and the European Union was held on June 10, 2009. The first round of negotiations took place in Ottawa from October 19 to 23, 2009. On January 18, 2010, Canada and the European Union met in Brussels for the second round of negotiations. The third round of negotiations took place in Ottawa from April 19 to 23, 2010. The fourth took place in Brussels from 12 to 16 July, the fifth in Ottawa from 18 to 22 October 2010, and the sixth round of negotiations took place in Brussels from 17 to 21 January 2011. The two countries held a seventh round of talks in April 2011, while the eighth round took place on 15 July 2011. The ninth round of negotiations took place in Ottawa from October 17 to 21, 2011. In cetA`s consolidated text, iPR (p. 339-375) deals with copyright, trademarks, patents, drawings, trade secrets and licenses. It refers to the TRIPS agreement (p.

339 f). In addition to the interests of the pharmaceutical industry and software, CETA encourages the continuation of the camera (Article 5.6, p. 343). Negotiations on food exports, in particular, have been very long. Interests in European cheese exports and Canadian beef exports have led to the protection of this type of intellectual property and long lists of “geographic indications for the identification of a product originating in the European Union” (p. 363-347). [39] The Ue-Canada Eider on Sustainable Development (EID), a three-part study commissioned by the European Commission to independent experts and completed in September 2011, provided a broad prediction of the impact of CETA. [30] [31] [32] It foresees a number of macroeconomic and sectoral impacts, indicating that in the long run the EU could see real GDP growth of 0.02 to 0.03% as a result of CETA, while it could increase from 0.18 to 0.36% in Canada; The “Investments” section of the report suggests that these figures could be higher when investment increases are taken into account. At the sectoral level, the study predicts that the strongest growth in production and trade will be driven by the liberalization of services and the removal of tariffs on sensitive agricultural products; it also proposes that CETA could have a positive social impact if it contains provisions on the ILO`s core labour standards and the Decent Work Agenda. The study describes a large number of effects in various “cross-cutting” components of CETA: it opposes the controversial NAFTA-style provisions of ISDS; provides for potentially unbalanced benefits of a chapter on public procurement (GP); assuming that CETA will lead to upward harmonization of intellectual property rules, including changes to Canada`s intellectual property laws; and foresees effects on competition policy and several other areas. [32] The closest countries tend to trade more, particularly goods, and this is the case in the United Kingdom and the EU.